Vitamin or antioxidant intake (or serum level) and risk of cervical neoplasm: a meta‐analysis

@article{Myung2011VitaminOA,
  title={Vitamin or antioxidant intake (or serum level) and risk of cervical neoplasm: a meta‐analysis},
  author={Seung Kwon Myung and Woong Ju and S. C. Kim and Hs Kim},
  journal={BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics \& Gynaecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={118}
}
  • S. Myung, W. Ju, +1 author Hs Kim
  • Published 1 October 2011
  • Medicine
  • BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Please cite this paper as: Myung S‐K, Ju W, Kim S, Kim H, for the Korean Meta‐analysis (KORMA) Study Group. Vitamin or antioxidant intake (or serum level) and risk of cervical neoplasm: a meta‐analysis. BJOG 2011;118:1285–1291. 
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