Vitamin and multiple-vitamin supplement intake and incidence of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

@article{Liu2014VitaminAM,
  title={Vitamin and multiple-vitamin supplement intake and incidence of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies},
  author={Yan Liu and Qiuyan Yu and Zhenli Zhu and Jun Zhang and Meilan Chen and Ping-Yi Tang and Ke Li},
  journal={Medical Oncology},
  year={2014},
  volume={32},
  pages={1-10}
}
This paper systematically evaluated the association of intake of different vitamins and multiple-vitamin supplements and the incidence of colorectal cancer. Relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE via PubMed (published up to April 2014). We extracted data from articles on vitamins A, C, D, E, B9 (folate), B2, B3, B6, and B12 and multiple-vitamin supplements. We used multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and a random-effects model for analysis and random effects. With heterogeneity, we… 
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