Vitamin E and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis

@article{Zhang2015VitaminEA,
  title={Vitamin E and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis},
  author={Yufei Zhang and Wenjie Jiang and Zhutian Xie and Wenlong Wu and Dongfeng Zhang},
  journal={Public Health Nutrition},
  year={2015},
  volume={18},
  pages={2804 - 2814}
}
Abstract Objective We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between vitamin E and age-related cataract (ARC). Design The fixed- or random-effect model was selected based on heterogeneity. Meta-regression was used to explore potential sources of between-study heterogeneity. Publication bias was evaluated using Begg’s test. The dose–response relationship was assessed by a restricted cubic spline model. Setting Relevant studies were identified by a search of PubMed and the… 
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TLDR
The data from a large trial of apparently healthy female health professionals with 9.7 years of treatment and follow-up indicate that 600 IU natural-source vitamin E taken every other day provides no benefit for age-related cataract or subtypes.
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The results strengthen the evidence for a protective role for vitamin C on the aging lens as this effect was seen in a population characterized by high vitamin C intakes.
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An index of overall antioxidant status was constructed, which indicated that higher levels of plasma antioxidants were not associated with risk of nuclear or cortical opacities and middle levels of alpha-tocopherol were associated with a reduced risk of cortical opacity.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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