Vitamin E: function and metabolism

@article{BrigeliusFlohe1999VitaminEF,
  title={Vitamin E: function and metabolism},
  author={Regina Brigelius-Flohé and Maret G. Traber},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={1999},
  volume={13},
  pages={1145 - 1155}
}
Although vitamin E has been known as an essential nutrient for reproduction since 1922, we are far from understanding the mechanisms of its physiological functions. Vitamin E is the term for a group of tocopherols and tocotrienols, of which α‐tocopherol has the highest biological activity. Due to the potent antioxidant properties of tocopherols, the impact of α‐tocopherol in the prevention of chronic diseases believed to be associated with oxidative stress has often been studied, and beneficial… Expand
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An update on vitamin E therapeutic potentials, protective effects and modes of action beyond cancer, with comparison of tocopherols against tocotrienols. Expand
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