Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys.

@article{Proskocil2005VitaminCP,
  title={Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys.},
  author={Becky J. Proskocil and Harmanjatinder S. Sekhon and Jennifer A Clark and Stacie L Lupo and Yibing Jia and William M. Hull and Jeffrey A. Whitsett and Barry C. Starcher and Eliot R. Spindel},
  journal={American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={171 9},
  pages={
          1032-9
        }
}
Smoking during pregnancy leads to decreased pulmonary function and increased respiratory illness in offspring. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that many effects of smoking during pregnancy are mediated by nicotine. We now report that vitamin C supplementation can prevent some of the effects of maternal nicotine exposure on pulmonary function of offspring. Timed-pregnant rhesus monkeys were treated with 2 mg/kg/day nicotine bitartrate from Gestation Days 26 to 160. On Gestation Day… 

Tables from this paper

Vitamin C supplementation ameliorates the adverse effects of nicotine on placental hemodynamics and histology in nonhuman primates.
Prenatal nicotine exposure alters lung function and airway geometry through α7 nicotinic receptors.
TLDR
A unified mechanism of how maternal smoking during pregnancy may lead to lifelong alterations in offspring pulmonary function and increased risk of asthma is provided, and potential targets to counteract those effects are suggested.
Effect of maternal nicotine exposure on neonatal rat lung development: protective effect of maternal ascorbic acid supplementation
TLDR
The results showed that maternal exposure to nicotine only or vitamin C only resulted in a gradual deterioration of the parenchyma of the lungs of the offspring, which resembled microscopic emphysema.
Vitamin C supplementation for pregnant smoking women and pulmonary function in their newborn infants: a randomized clinical trial.
TLDR
Newborns of women randomized to vitamin C, compared with those randomized to placebo, had improved pulmonary function as measured by TPTEF:TE and decreased wheezing through 1 year in the offspring.
Vitamin C to pregnant smokers persistently improves infant airway function to 12 months of age: a randomised trial
TLDR
In offspring of pregnant smokers randomised to vitamin C versus placebo, vitamin C during pregnancy was associated with a small but significantly increased airway function at 3 and 12 months of age, suggesting a potential shift to a higherAirway function trajectory curve.
Oral Vitamin C (500 mg/d) to Pregnant Smokers Improves Infant Airway Function at 3 Months (VCSIP). A Randomized Trial
TLDR
Although the primary outcome of FEF75 was not improved after vitamin C supplementation to pregnant smokers, the predetermined secondary outcomes FEF50 and FEF25‐75 were significantly improved.
Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Nicotine Exposure on Lung Development.
TLDR
This review examines the role of prenatal and postnatal tobacco smoke and nicotine exposure and its association with augmenting infection risk, skewing the immune response toward a T-helper type 2 bias and increasing risk for developing an allergic phenotype and asthmalike symptoms during childhood.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 105 REFERENCES
The influence of maternal nicotine exposure on neonatal lung metabolism. Protective effect of ascorbic acid.
  • G. Maritz
  • Medicine, Biology
    Cell biology international
  • 1993
TLDR
The data show that ascorbic acid supplementation during pregnancy and lactation prevented the adverse effects of maternal nicotine exposure on neonatal lung carbohydrate, DNA and protein metabolism.
Influence of maternal nicotine exposure on neonatal rat lung structure: protective effect of ascorbic acid.
  • G. MaritzG. V. van Wyk
  • Biology, Medicine
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part C, Pharmacology, toxicology & endocrinology
  • 1997
Effect of maternal nicotine exposure on growth in vivo of lung tissue of neonatal rats.
  • G. Maritz
  • Medicine, Biology
    Biology of the neonate
  • 1988
TLDR
It is proposed that nicotine's marked inhibitory effect on glycolysis probably results in type I cell injury and consequently enhanced cell proliferation in neonatal rats and causes enhanced lung cellular multiplication.
The effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy on early infant lung function.
TLDR
It is concluded that maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with significant reductions in forced expiratory flow rates in young infants, both when unadjusted and after controlling for infant size, age, sex, and passive exposure to environmental tobacco smoke between birth and the time of PF testing.
Prenatal nicotine exposure increases connective tissue expression in foetal monkey pulmonary vessels
TLDR
Findings suggest that with smoking during pregnancy, nicotine is transported across the placenta and directly interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in pulmonary vessels to alter connective tissue expression and therefore produce vascular structural alterations.
The effect of parental smoking on lung function and development during infancy
TLDR
The findings emphasize the need to keep infants in a smoke‐free environment both before and after birth, not least because of growing awareness that airway function in later life is largely determined by that during foetal development and early infancy.
Association of Intrauterine Cigarette Smoke Exposure With Indices of Fetal Lung Maturation
The timing of fetal lung maturation is regulated, at least in part, by the fetal endocrine milieu, which in turn may be influenced by environmental factors. Infants of smoking mothers are at
Exposure of the fetus, neonate, and nursed infant to nicotine and cotinine from maternal smoking.
TLDR
Perinatal exposure to nicotine and cotinine by diaplacental and possibly paraPLacental transfer appears to be quantitatively much more important than postnatal exposure by means of breast milk or inhaled air.
Nicotine stimulates branching and expression of SP-A and SP-C mRNAs in embryonic mouse lung culture.
TLDR
It is found that embryonic lungs explanted at 11 days gestation showed a 32% increase in branching after 4 days in culture in the presence of 1 μM nicotine and 7- to 15-fold increases in mRNAs encoding surfactant proteins A and C after 11 days.
Maternal smoking during pregnancy. Effects on lung function during the first 18 months of life.
TLDR
Data provide further evidence that maternal smoking during pregnancy may play a greater role than postnatal and childhood exposure on the observed effects on lung function in children.
...
...