Vitamin A and Breast Cancer Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta‐analysis

@article{He2018VitaminAA,
  title={Vitamin A and Breast Cancer Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta‐analysis},
  author={Juanjuan He and Yuanting Gu and Shaojin Zhang},
  journal={Clinical Breast Cancer},
  year={2018},
  volume={18},
  pages={e1389–e1400}
}

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