Visual-vestibular conflict induced by virtual reality in humans

@article{Akiduki2003VisualvestibularCI,
  title={Visual-vestibular conflict induced by virtual reality in humans},
  author={Hironori Akiduki and Suetaka Nishiike and Hiroshi Watanabe and Katsunori Matsuoka and Takeshi Kubo and Noriaki Takeda},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={2003},
  volume={340},
  pages={197-200}
}
Conflicting inputs from visual and vestibular afferents produce motion sickness and postural instability. However, the relationship of visual and vestibular inputs to each other remains obscure. In this study, we examined the development of subjective sickness- and balance-related symptoms and objective equilibrium ataxia induced by visual-vestibular conflict (VVC) stimulation using virtual reality. The subjective symptoms evaluated by Graybiel's and Hamilton's criteria got gradually worse… 
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