Visual self-recognition in autistic children: developmental relationships.

@article{Spiker1984VisualSI,
  title={Visual self-recognition in autistic children: developmental relationships.},
  author={Donna Spiker and M C Ricks},
  journal={Child development},
  year={1984},
  volume={55 1},
  pages={214-25}
}
Employing a mirror procedure, 52 autistic children (CA = 3-7 to 12-8, means = 7-7) were tested for visual self-recognition. Substantial behavioral and psychometric data were collected from school records, teacher interviews, and classroom observations. Of the 52 children, 36 (69%) showed evidence of mirror self-recognition, while 16 (31%) failed to give clear indications of recognizing their mirror images. The 2 groups did not differ on CA. Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major… CONTINUE READING

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Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major factor differentiating the 2 groups : those who failed to show evidence of visual self - recognition were more likely than those who did show evidence of visual recognition to be mute or lacking in communicative speech ( p less than .001 ) .
Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major factor differentiating the 2 groups : those who failed to show evidence of visual self - recognition were more likely than those who did show evidence of visual recognition to be mute or lacking in communicative speech ( p less than .001 ) .
Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major factor differentiating the 2 groups : those who failed to show evidence of visual self - recognition were more likely than those who did show evidence of visual recognition to be mute or lacking in communicative speech ( p less than .001 ) .
Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major factor differentiating the 2 groups : those who failed to show evidence of visual self - recognition were more likely than those who did show evidence of visual recognition to be mute or lacking in communicative speech ( p less than .001 ) .
Severity of language impairment appeared to be a major factor differentiating the 2 groups : those who failed to show evidence of visual self - recognition were more likely than those who did show evidence of visual recognition to be mute or lacking in communicative speech ( p less than .001 ) .
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