Visual prey detection by near-infrared cues in a fish

@article{Meuthen2012VisualPD,
  title={Visual prey detection by near-infrared cues in a fish},
  author={Denis Meuthen and Ingolf P. Rick and Timo Th{\"u}nken and S. A. Baldauf},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2012},
  volume={99},
  pages={1063-1066}
}
Many animal species are able to perceive light wavelengths beyond those visible to humans. While numerous species are additionally sensitive to short wavelengths (UV), long wavelengths such as the near-infrared spectrum (NIR) are supposed to be unsuitable for visual perception. Here, we experimentally show that under exclusive NIR illumination, the cichlid fish Pelvicachromis taeniatus displays a clear foraging response towards NIR reflecting prey. Additional control experiments without prey… Expand
Sensitivity Differences in Fish Offer Near-Infrared Vision as an Adaptable Evolutionary Trait
TLDR
A clear correlation between NIR sensation thresholds and availability of NIR in the natural habitats is revealed, suggesting that NIR vision, as an integral part of the whole spectrum of visual abilities, can serve as an evolutionarily adaptable trait in fish. Expand
Zebrafish larvae show negative phototaxis to near-infrared light
TLDR
It is demonstrated that zebrafish larvae are able to perceive NIR at 860 nm, which is almost identical to the most commonly used light source in commercial screening systems to create a dark environment. Expand
Can species‐specific prey responses to chemical cues explain prey susceptibility to predation?
TLDR
It is suggested that chemical cue perception might be behind community data change and it is encouraged to collect more community data of tested prey species before and after European catfish introduction to test the hypothesis. Expand
Sensory basis for detection of benthic prey in two Lake Malawi cichlids.
TLDR
Investigating how functionally distinctive differences in sensory morphology are correlated with feeding behavior in the laboratory and determining the role of sensory systems in feeding ecology will provide insights into how sensory capabilities may contribute to trophic niche segregation. Expand
Natural Hydrodynamic Stimuli
Aquatic animals of all major phyla have developed sensory systems to perceive water movements, so-called hydrodynamic sensory systems. These water movements, or hydrodynamic stimuli, arise from aExpand
Flow Sensing in Air and Water
Aquatic animals of all major phyla have developed sensory systems to perceive water movements, so-called hydrodynamic sensory systems. These water movements, or hydrodynamic stimuli, arise from aExpand
Matched Filter Properties of Infrared Receptors Used for Fire and Heat Detection in Insects
About 25 insect species are attracted by forest fires and thus can be found on freshly burnt areas after fires. In three genera of pyrophilous beetles and one genus of pyrophilous bugs, infrared (IR)Expand
Cuticle as Functional Interface in Insect Infrared Receptors
TLDR
The chapter provides an overview about the known insect IR receptors with a focus on the impact of the cuticle in IR perception. Expand
Climbing Perch Anabas testudineus Feeding in the Darkness: Observation in Infrared Light
Abstract A comparative study of the nutrition of climbing perch Anabas testudineus (Bloch, 1792)–fed with granular food with positive buoyancy in the light (~100 lux), in darkness, and under infraredExpand
Hydrodynamic Stimuli and Hydrodynamic Noise
Synopsis Hydrodynamic stimuli that can be received by hydrodynamic sensory systems of aquatic animals are described, classified and discussed. Mathematical approaches and measurement techniques areExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Visual pigments and environmental light
TLDR
There is evidence based on immunocytochemistry and action spectra that at least some of the skin and pineal receptors contain visual pigments, but like those of the rods, these do not match the spectral quality of the environmental light. Expand
Dragon fish see using chlorophyll scientific correspondence
    8 M ost deep-sea fish have visual pigments that are most sensitive to wavelengths around 460–490 nm, the intensity maxima of both conventional blue bioluminescence and dim residual sunlight 1. TheExpand
    Visual pigments and the acquisition of visual information.
    TLDR
    Significant differences between the cone sets of animals living within the same environment and colour vision polymorphism within a species suggest that visual tasks critical to survival or breeding success require particular visual pigment sets. Expand
    Effects of Degraded Optical Conditions on Behavioural Responses to Alarm Cues in a Freshwater Fish
    TLDR
    The increased reliance on chemical cues indicates that crucian carp can compensate for the reduced information content from vision in waters where optical conditions are degraded. Expand
    The Adaptation of Visual Pigments to the Photic Environment
    In 1936 Clarke wrote: “These results [clear ocean water selectively transmits blue light] raise the question of the possibility of a shift in sensitivity of the eyes of a deep water fish towards theExpand
    Color signaling in conspicuous red sticklebacks: do ultraviolet signals surpass others?
    TLDR
    First experimental evidence that the UV wave band clearly outranks at least one other part of an animal's visible spectrum (SW-) in the context of communication is reported. Expand
    Non-rod, non-cone photoreception in the vertebrates
    TLDR
    This review hopes to convince the more casual reader that there is much more to vertebrate photoreceptors than the study of retinal rods and cones, and that inner retinal photoreception will be a feature of all vertebrates. Expand
    Ultra-violet photoreceptors in the animal kingdom: their distribution and function.
    • M. Tovee
    • Biology, Medicine
    • Trends in ecology & evolution
    • 1995
    TLDR
    A host of detailed information has become available on the widespread distribution of UV receptors in different species - from insects to mammals - and the important functions they seem to play in navigation, foraging, intraspecies communication and the control of circadian rhythms. Expand
    Photoreceptor spectral sensitivities: Common shape in the long-wavelength region
    • T. Lamb
    • Medicine, Physics
    • Vision Research
    • 1995
    TLDR
    A simple equation is presented as a generic description for the alpha-band of mammalian photoreceptor spectral sensitivity curves, and it seem likely that the equation may be equally applicable to retinal1-based pigments in other species. Expand
    The visibility of 350 °C black-body radiation by the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata and man
    The eye of the 'eyeless' shrimp Rimicaris exoculata is unusual in having no image-forming optics and a high concentration of rhodopsin1. The shrimps swarm around 350 °C hydrothermal 'black smoker'Expand
    ...
    1
    2
    3
    4
    ...