Corpus ID: 6079764

Visual perceptual functions predict instrumental activities of daily living in patients with dementia.

@article{Glosser2002VisualPF,
  title={Visual perceptual functions predict instrumental activities of daily living in patients with dementia.},
  author={Guila Glosser and Jennifer L. Gallo and N Duda and Jeroen J de Vries and Christopher Clark and Murray Grossman},
  journal={Neuropsychiatry, neuropsychology, and behavioral neurology},
  year={2002},
  volume={15 3},
  pages={
          198-206
        }
}
  • Guila Glosser, Jennifer L. Gallo, +3 authors Murray Grossman
  • Published in
    Neuropsychiatry…
    2002
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • OBJECTIVE To assess relations between discrete visual perceptual functions commonly affected in patients with neurodegenerative dementia and the performance of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). BACKGROUND Neuropsychologic measures are often used to predict IADL performances in dementia patients. Prior studies have focused on the contribution of higher-level memory and executive deficits to IADL. The relation between visuoperceptual dysfunction and IADL has not been studied… CONTINUE READING

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