Visual orienting and alerting in rhesus monkeys: comparison with humans

@article{Witte1996VisualOA,
  title={Visual orienting and alerting in rhesus monkeys: comparison with humans},
  author={E. A. Witte and Marcelo J. Villareal and Richard T. Marrocco},
  journal={Behavioural Brain Research},
  year={1996},
  volume={82},
  pages={103-112}
}
The behavioral capacities of the rhesus monkey for several sensory and cognitive tasks appear quite similar to those of humans. To evaluate the monkey's attentional capacities, we have compared monkey and human performance on a visuospatial attentional task, the cued target detection (CTD) paradigm. Animals were trained to fixate a small spot of light while a cue and a subsequent target, are flashed in the visual periphery. In valid trials, the cue and target appeared in the same spatial… 
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