Visual fields and their functions in birds

@article{Martin2007VisualFA,
  title={Visual fields and their functions in birds},
  author={Graham R. Martin},
  journal={Journal of Ornithology},
  year={2007},
  volume={148},
  pages={547-562}
}
  • G. Martin
  • Published 5 September 2007
  • Biology
  • Journal of Ornithology
Among birds there are considerable interspecific differences in all aspects of visual fields. However, it is hypothesised that the topography of the frontal binocular portion of fields are of only three main types, and their principal functions lie in the degree to which vision is used in the guidance of the bill (or feet) towards food objects or for the provisioning of chicks. In the majority of birds, the width of the frontal binocular field is narrow (20°–30° maximum). It shows a high degree… 
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