Visual feature integration theory: past, present, and future.

@article{Quinlan2003VisualFI,
  title={Visual feature integration theory: past, present, and future.},
  author={Philip T. Quinlan},
  journal={Psychological bulletin},
  year={2003},
  volume={129 5},
  pages={
          643-73
        }
}
  • P. Quinlan
  • Published 1 September 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychological bulletin
Visual feature integration theory was one of the most influential theories of visual information processing in the last quarter of the 20th century. This article provides an exposition of the theory and a review of the associated data. In the past much emphasis has been placed on how the theory explains performance in various visual search tasks. The relevant literature is discussed and alternative accounts are described. Amendments to the theory are also set out. Many other issues concerning… Expand

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