Visual depth processing in Williams–Beuren syndrome

@article{Geest2005VisualDP,
  title={Visual depth processing in Williams–Beuren syndrome},
  author={J. Geest and G. C. Lagers-van Haselen and J. M. Hagen and E. Brenner and L. Govaerts and I. D. Coo and M. Frens},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={166},
  pages={200-209}
}
Patients with Williams–Beuren Syndrome (WBS, also known as Williams Syndrome) show many problems in motor activities requiring visuo-motor integration, such as walking stairs. We tested to what extent these problems might be related to a deficit in the perception of visual depth or to problems in using this information in guiding movements. Monocular and binocular visual depth perception was tested in 33 patients with WBS. Furthermore, hand movements to a target were recorded in conditions with… Expand
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