Visual change detection recruits auditory cortices in early deafness

@article{Bottari2014VisualCD,
  title={Visual change detection recruits auditory cortices in early deafness},
  author={Davide Bottari and Benedetta Heimler and Anne Caclin and Anna Dalmolin and Marie-H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Giard and Francesco Pavani},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2014},
  volume={94},
  pages={172-184}
}
Although cross-modal recruitment of early sensory areas in deafness and blindness is well established, the constraints and limits of these plastic changes remain to be understood. In the case of human deafness, for instance, it is known that visual, tactile or visuo-tactile stimuli can elicit a response within the auditory cortices. Nonetheless, both the timing of these evoked responses and the functional contribution of cross-modally recruited areas remain to be ascertained. In the present… Expand
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  • M. Liang, Yuebo Chen, +8 authors Y. Zheng
  • Medicine
  • Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • 2017
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