Corpus ID: 14957262

Vision in dogs.

@article{Miller1995VisionID,
  title={Vision in dogs.},
  author={Paul Eduard Miller and Christopher J. Murphy},
  journal={Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
  year={1995},
  volume={207 12},
  pages={
          1623-34
        }
}
  • P. Miller, C. Murphy
  • Published 15 December 1995
  • Medicine, Computer Science
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Compared with the visual system in human beings, the canine visual system could be considered inferior in such aspects as degree of binocular overlap, color perception, accommodative range, and visual acuity. However, in other aspects of vision, such as ability to function in dim light, rapidity with which the retina can respond to another image (flicker fusion), field of view, ability to differentiate shades of gray, and perhaps, ability to detect motion, the canine visual system probably… Expand
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