Visibility of natural tertiary rainbows.

@article{Lee2011VisibilityON,
  title={Visibility of natural tertiary rainbows.},
  author={Raymond L. Lee and Philip Laven},
  journal={Applied optics},
  year={2011},
  volume={50 28},
  pages={
          F152-61
        }
}
Naturally occurring tertiary rainbows are extraordinarily rare and only a handful of reliable sightings and photographs have been published. Indeed, tertiaries are sometimes assumed to be inherently invisible because of sun glare and strong forward scattering by raindrops. To analyze the natural tertiary's visibility, we use Lorenz-Mie theory, the Debye series, and a modified geometrical optics model (including both interference and nonspherical drops) to calculate the tertiary's (1… 

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