Viruses of the Archaea: a unifying view

@article{Prangishvili2006VirusesOT,
  title={Viruses of the Archaea: a unifying view},
  author={David Prangishvili and Patrick Forterre and Roger A. Garrett},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={4},
  pages={837-848}
}
DNA viruses of the Archaea have highly diverse and often exceptionally complex morphotypes. Many have been isolated from geothermally heated hot environments, raising intriguing questions about their origins, and contradicting the widespread notion of limited biodiversity in extreme environments. Here, we provide a unifying view on archaeal viruses, and present them as a particular assemblage that is fundamentally different in morphotype and genome from the DNA viruses of the other two domains… 
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