Virulence evolution and the trade‐off hypothesis: history, current state of affairs and the future

@article{Alizon2009VirulenceEA,
  title={Virulence evolution and the trade‐off hypothesis: history, current state of affairs and the future},
  author={Samuel Alizon and Amy Hurford and Nicole Mideo and Minus van Baalen},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={22}
}
It has been more than two decades since the formulation of the so‐called ‘trade‐off’ hypothesis as an alternative to the then commonly accepted idea that parasites should always evolve towards avirulence (the ‘avirulence hypothesis’). The trade‐off hypothesis states that virulence is an unavoidable consequence of parasite transmission; however, since the 1990s, this hypothesis has been increasingly challenged. We discuss the history of the study of virulence evolution and the development of… Expand
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