Virology: Bird flu in mammals

@article{Yen2012VirologyBF,
  title={Virology: Bird flu in mammals},
  author={Hui-ling Yen and J S Malik Peiris},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={486},
  pages={332-333}
}
An engineered influenza virus based on a haemagglutinin protein from H5N1 avian influenza, with just four mutations, can be transmitted between ferrets, emphasizing the potential for a human pandemic to emerge from birds. See Letter p.420 Whether avian H5N1 viruses can gain the ability to transmit between humans was uncertain. The viral haemagglutinin protein (HA) mediates virus binding to host-specific cellular receptors, but previous studies have shown that alterations in HA that enable… 

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