Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work, and: Who Killed Virginia Woolf?: A Psychobiography, and: Virginia Woolf: A Study of the Short Fiction, and: Virginia Woolf: Strategist of Language (review)

@article{Poole1991VirginiaWT,
  title={Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work, and: Who Killed Virginia Woolf?: A Psychobiography, and: Virginia Woolf: A Study of the Short Fiction, and: Virginia Woolf: Strategist of Language (review)},
  author={Roger Poole},
  journal={MFS Modern Fiction Studies},
  year={1991},
  volume={37},
  pages={300 - 305}
}
  • R. Poole
  • Published 1 January 2009
  • Art
  • MFS Modern Fiction Studies
"unnatural" attachments, as in the relationship of character such as Pip and Miss Havisham, for whom Estella in Great Expectations is a sort of substitute, and in the brother-sister relationship that interferes with Maggie Tulliver's pursuit of permitted sex in The Mill on the Floss. In these novels and in all of the others discussed, however respectable and "Victorian" (for example, in Trollope's novels about Phineas Finn), we find heroes and heroines who are stumbling, often blind and…