Viral mortality of marine bacteria and cyanobacteria

@article{Proctor1990ViralMO,
  title={Viral mortality of marine bacteria and cyanobacteria},
  author={Lita M. Proctor and Jed A. Fuhrman},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1990},
  volume={343},
  pages={60-62}
}
DESPITE the importance of cyanobacteria in global primary productivity1and of heterotrophic bacteria in the consumption of organic matter in the sea2, the causes of their mortality, particularly the cyanobacteria, are poorly understood. It is usually assumed that mortality is due to protozoan grazing3,4 rather than to viral infection, probably because abundances of phage and host in nature are presumed to be low5. Previously, either very few marine bacteriophages have been found by plaque… Expand
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