Viral Misinformation: The Role of Homophily and Polarization

@article{Anagnostopoulos2015ViralMT,
  title={Viral Misinformation: The Role of Homophily and Polarization},
  author={Aris Anagnostopoulos and Alessandro Bessi and Guido Caldarelli and Michela Del Vicario and Fabio Petroni and Antonio Scala and Fabiana Zollo and Walter Quattrociocchi},
  journal={Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on World Wide Web},
  year={2015}
}
The spreading of unsubstantiated rumors on online social networks (OSN) either unintentionally or intentionally (e.g., for political reasons or even trolling) can have serious consequences such as in the recent case of rumors about Ebola causing disruption to health-care workers. Here we show that indicators aimed at quantifying information consumption patterns might provide important insights about the virality of false claims. In particular, we address the driving forces behind the popularity… 

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