Viral Eukaryogenesis: Was the Ancestor of the Nucleus a Complex DNA Virus?

@article{Bell2001ViralEW,
  title={Viral Eukaryogenesis: Was the Ancestor of the Nucleus a Complex DNA Virus?},
  author={P. Bell},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2001},
  volume={53},
  pages={251-256}
}
  • P. Bell
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
In the theory of viral eukaryogenesis I propose here, the eukaryotic nucleus evolved from a complex DNA virus. It is proposed that the virus established a persistent presence in the cytoplasm of a methanogenic mycoplasma and evolved into the eukaryotic nucleus by acquiring a set of essential genes from the host genome and eventually usurping its role. It is proposed that several characteristic features of the eukaryotic nucleus derive from its viral ancestry. These include mRNA capping, linear… Expand
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