Violent interactions between bottlenose dolphins and harbour porpoises

@article{Ross1996ViolentIB,
  title={Violent interactions between bottlenose dolphins and harbour porpoises},
  author={Harry M. Ross and Ben Wilson},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={283 - 286}
}
  • H. Ross, B. Wilson
  • Published 22 March 1996
  • Environmental Science
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
The majority (63%) of harbour porpoises stranded around the Moray Firth, Scotland, died from trauma characterized by multiple skeletal fractures and damaged internal organs. Surface injuries consisted of skin cuts resembling the teeth marks inflicted by one cetacean on another. The spacings between these matched those between teeth in bottlenose dolphins, of which there is a population in the Moray Firth. Four violent dolphin-porpoise interactions have been witnessed. Reasons for these… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

EVIDENCE FOR INFANTICIDE IN BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS OF THE WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC
TLDR
The evidence suggests that violent dolphin behavior was the cause of the trauma in the nine calves reported here and that infanticide occurs in bottlenose dolphins of the western North Atlantic.
Male-male aggression renders bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus ) unconscious
TLDR
A unique encounter involving a long-term male alliance competing with a ‘ solo’ male resulted in the temporary loss of consciousness of the lone male following repeated physical blows to his head region, illustrating the potential severity of aggressive interactions among adult bottlenose dolphins.
CO‐VARIATION IN THE PROBABILITIES OF SIGHTING HARBOR PORPOISES AND BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS
Evidence of violent interactions between bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) has now been found in several parts of their range, but the factors
Postmortem evidence of interactions of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with other dolphin species in south-west England
TLDR
Analysis of photographs taken before establishment of the Marine Strandings Network revealed rake (teeth) marks consistent with bottlenose dolphin interaction on one stranded common dolphin in 1992 and it is probable that the interactions did contribute to stranding and/or death in all four of the juvenile animals examined.
Evidence for infanticide in bottlenose dolphins: an explanation for violent interactions with harbour porpoises?
TLDR
It is suggested that infanticide must be considered as a factor shaping sociality in this and other species of cetaceans, and may have serious consequences for the viability of small populations.
Infanticide attacks and associated epimeletic behaviour in free-ranging common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
TLDR
The circumstances under which these infanticides occurred at the site fit the conditions proposed under the sexual selection hypothesis and the aggressive interaction between adult individuals and the neonates together with the observed ante-mortem injuries bore a strong resemblance to the behaviours and traumatic injuries described in other cases of violent dolphin interactions in other parts of the world.
Prevalence of External Injuries in Small Cetaceans in Aruban Waters, Southern Caribbean
TLDR
The results of this study indicate that fishing gear and propeller hits may pose threats to small and medium-sized cetaceans in Aruban waters and long-term monitoring of population trends is warranted.
Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) aggressive behavior towards other cetacean species in the western Mediterranean
TLDR
It is provided the first evidence that bottlenose dolphins in the western Mediterranean exhibit aggressive behavior towards both striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus).
Porpoises: From predators to prey
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-5 OF 5 REFERENCES
Cetaceans in British waters
TLDR
Present evidence suggests that only the large whales exhibit definite latitudinal migrations, all other species being resident at high latitudes although they may show offshore-inshore or possibly small latitudinal movements.
The ecology of bottlenose dolphins in the Moray Firth , Scotland : a population at the northern extreme of the species ’ range
  • 1995
Some observations on wound healing and persistence of scars in Turslops truncatus
  • 1990
Distribution and abundance of the harbour porpoise and other small cetaceans in the North Sea and adjacent waters
  • 1995