• Corpus ID: 81331313

Vigilance, flock size and domain of danger size in the White-fronted Goose

@inproceedings{Lazarus1978VigilanceFS,
  title={Vigilance, flock size and domain of danger size in the White-fronted Goose},
  author={John Lazarus},
  year={1978}
}
This paper investigates two hypotheses associated with the proposal that flocking in birds reduces the individual’s risk of preda­ tion. Gregariousness might function in this way by making the predator’s search and detection problem m ore difficult, by providing earlier warning of predatory ap­ proach and by reducing the risk of capture should an encounter with a predator occur (e.g. Hamilton 1971; Vine 1971, 1973; Lazarus 1972; Treisman 1975a, b). Em­ pirical support for these proposals has… 

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