Viewing it differently: Social scene perception in Williams syndrome and Autism

@article{Riby2008ViewingID,
  title={Viewing it differently: Social scene perception in Williams syndrome and Autism},
  author={D. Riby and P. Hancock},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2008},
  volume={46},
  pages={2855-2860}
}
The genetic disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a propulsion towards social stimuli and interactions with people. In contrast, the neuro-developmental disorder autism is characterised by social withdrawal and lack of interest in socially relevant information. Using eye-tracking techniques we investigate how individuals with these two neuro-developmental disorders associated with distinct social characteristics view scenes containing people. The way individuals with these… Expand

Paper Mentions

Looking at movies and cartoons: eye-tracking evidence from Williams syndrome and autism.
  • D. Riby, P. Hancock
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR
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TLDR
The reported gaze behaviours provide experimental evidence of the divergent social interests associated with autism and WS. Expand
Do Faces Capture the Attention of Individuals with Williams Syndrome or Autism? Evidence from Tracking Eye Movements
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of autism and developmental disorders
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TLDR
The neuro-developmental disorders of Williams syndrome and autism can reveal key components of social cognition and attention mechanisms, and individuals with WS showed prolonged face gaze across tasks, relating to the typical WS social phenotype. Expand
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Results indicate a superficially normal attentional preference for social information in adults with ASD and more sensitive measures show that ASD does entail social attention problems across the lifespan, supporting accounts of the disorder which emphasise lifelong neurodevelopmental atypicalities. Expand
Violations of Personal Space in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Insights from the Social Responsiveness Scale
TLDR
Investigation of personal space awareness in Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorder compared to typical development finds some similarities are present in the ability, or indeed inability, to regulate interpersonal distance during social interactions. Expand
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TLDR
It is proposed that analysis of changes in visual attention and physiological level to social stimuli might be an integral part of a neurodevelopmental assessment. Expand
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TLDR
There was a suggestion that individuals with WS (compared to those developing typically) found it much more time consuming to disengage from faces than objects, and possible face disengagement difficulties in WS. Expand
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Results show that social orienting is actually not qualitatively impaired and that decreased attention to faces does not generalized across contexts. Expand
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