Video analysis of host–parasite interactions in nests of Darwin’s finches

@article{OConnor2010VideoAO,
  title={Video analysis of host–parasite interactions in nests of Darwin’s finches},
  author={Jody A. O’Connor and Jeremy G. M. Robertson and Sonia Kleindorfer},
  journal={Oryx},
  year={2010},
  volume={44},
  pages={588 - 594}
}
Abstract Parasites place their hosts under strong selection for adaptive traits that increase parasite resistance. The initial impact of invasive parasites has rarely been observed and can be particularly strong on naïve hosts with limited prior exposure to parasites. Philornis downsi is an introduced fly to the Galapagos Islands whose parasitic larvae cause high mortality in nestlings of Darwin's finches. We used a within-nest camera system and nest monitoring data to examine this new host… Expand
Host-parasite ecology, behavior and genetics: a review of the introduced fly parasite Philornis downsi and its Darwin’s finch hosts
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This review examines the rapid changes in host and parasite ecology, behavior, and genetics since P. downsi larvae were first discovered in Darwin’s finch nests to synthesize what is known about this lethal host-parasite system and to describe rapidChanges inHost and parasite biology that characterize the novel association. Expand
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Parasitism by an invasive nest fly reduces future reproduction in Galápagos mockingbirds
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Delayed effects of an introduced nest parasite, Philornis downsi, on reproduction of Galápagos mockingbirds and the potential implications that introduced parasites have for host reproductive strategies are drawn. Expand
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Nestling behaviour predicts naris deformation in Darwin’s finches parasitized by the avian vampire fly
TLDR
Small ground finches on Floreana Island that had been parasitized by the invasive avian vampire fly tested whether differences in nestling behaviour mediate the negative effects of parasitism, and found that more responsive nestlings suffer greater fitness costs due to parasitism. Expand
Avian vampire fly (Philornis downsi) mortality differs across Darwin's finch host species.
TLDR
Overall, the finding of differences in avian vampire fly survival across host species is parsimonious with the idea that the introduced fly may be evolving towards host specialisation. Expand
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