Victorian dragons: The reluctant brood

@article{Berman1984VictorianDT,
  title={Victorian dragons: The reluctant brood},
  author={Ruth Aronson Berman},
  journal={Children's Literature in Education},
  year={1984},
  volume={15},
  pages={220-233}
}
  • R. Berman
  • Published 1 December 1984
  • Sociology
  • Children's Literature in Education
3 Citations
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