Victim entitlement to behave selfishly.

@article{Zitek2010VictimET,
  title={Victim entitlement to behave selfishly.},
  author={Emily M. Zitek and A. H. Jordan and B. Monin and Frederick R Leach},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={98 2},
  pages={
          245-55
        }
}
  • Emily M. Zitek, A. H. Jordan, +1 author Frederick R Leach
  • Published 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • Three experiments demonstrated that feeling wronged leads to a sense of entitlement and to selfish behavior. In Experiment 1, participants instructed to recall a time when their lives were unfair were more likely to refuse to help the experimenter with a supplementary task than were participants who recalled a time when they were bored. In Experiment 2, the same manipulation increased intentions to engage in a number of selfish behaviors, and this effect was mediated by self-reported… CONTINUE READING
    153 Citations
    A Victim Who Hasn't Been Wronged Yet: Can Events in the Future Make Us Selfish in the Present?
    • Highly Influenced
    Psychological Entitlement Predicts Failure to Follow Instructions
    • 6
    • PDF
    Feeling Entitled to More
    • 58
    • PDF
    Beyond Deserving More
    • 11
    Selfish or selfless? On the signal value of emotion in altruistic behavior.
    • 89
    • PDF

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES
    Social exclusion decreases prosocial behavior.
    • 852
    • PDF
    Social exclusion impairs self-regulation.
    • 1,015
    • PDF
    Psychological Entitlement: Interpersonal Consequences and Validation of a Self-Report Measure
    • 697
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    The Dynamics and Dangers of Entitlement
    • 63
    • PDF
    Gratitude and Prosocial Behavior
    • 695
    • PDF
    Remembering historical victimization: collective guilt for current ingroup transgressions.
    • 186
    From power to action.
    • 1,269
    Disrespect and the experience of injustice.
    • D. Miller
    • Sociology, Medicine
    • Annual review of psychology
    • 2001
    • 639
    • PDF