Vestigial Biological Structures: A Classroom-Applicable Test of Creationist Hypotheses

@inproceedings{Senter2015VestigialBS,
  title={Vestigial Biological Structures: A Classroom-Applicable Test of Creationist Hypotheses},
  author={P. Senter and Zenis Ambrocio and J. B. Andrade and Katanya K. Foust and J. E. Gaston and R. P. Lewis and R. M. Liniewski and Bobby Ragin and Khanna L. Robinson and S. Stanley},
  year={2015}
}
Abstract Lists of vestigial biological structures in biology textbooks are so short that some young-Earth creationist authors claim that scientists have lost confidence in the existence of vestigial structures and can no longer identify any verifiable ones. We tested these hypotheses with a method that is easily adapted to biology classes. We used online search engines to find examples of 21st-century articles in primary scientific literature in which biological structures are identified as… Expand
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