Vestibular labyrinth diversity in diprotodontian marsupial mammals

@inproceedings{Schmelzle2007VestibularLD,
  title={Vestibular labyrinth diversity in diprotodontian marsupial mammals},
  author={Thomas Schmelzle and Marcelo R. S{\'a}nchez-Villagra and Wolfgang Maier},
  year={2007}
}
ABSTRACT The bony labyrinth of specimens representing eight diprotodontian species were visualized by high-resolution computed tomography. Linear measurements of the labyrinth were taken, e.g., the height and width of the arc of each semicircular canal. The relative sizes and spatial arrangements of the semicircular canals were compared and some of the variation was atomized into 17 characters, which were then phylogenetically interpreted. There has been a change both in size and in relative… 
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