Vertebrate biodiversity losses point to a sixth mass extinction

@article{McCallum2015VertebrateBL,
  title={Vertebrate biodiversity losses point to a sixth mass extinction},
  author={Malcolm L. McCallum},
  journal={Biodiversity and Conservation},
  year={2015},
  volume={24},
  pages={2497-2519}
}
  • Malcolm L. McCallum
  • Published 2015
  • Biology
  • Biodiversity and Conservation
  • The human race faces many global to local challenges in the near future. Among these are massive biodiversity losses. The 2012 IUCN/SSC Red List reported evaluations of ~56 % of all vertebrates. This included 97 % of amphibians, mammals, birds, cartilaginous fishes, and hagfishes. It also contained evaluations of ~50 % of lampreys, ~38 % of reptiles, and ~29 % of bony fishes. A cursory examination of extinction magnitudes does not immediately reveal the severity of current biodiversity losses… CONTINUE READING

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