Verified bites by yellow sac spiders (genus Cheiracanthium) in the United States and Australia: where is the necrosis?

@article{Vetter2006VerifiedBB,
  title={Verified bites by yellow sac spiders (genus Cheiracanthium) in the United States and Australia: where is the necrosis?},
  author={R. Vetter and G. Isbister and S. Bush and Lisa J Boutin},
  journal={The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene},
  year={2006},
  volume={74 6},
  pages={
          1043-8
        }
}
Spiders of the genus Cheiracanthium are frequently reported in review articles and medical references to be a definitive cause of dermonecrosis or necrotic arachnidism in humans. We provide 20 cases of verified bites by Cheiracanthium spiders from the United States and Australia, none with necrosis. A review of the international literature on 39 verified Cheiracanthium bites found only one case of mild necrosis in the European species C. punctorium. The basis for the suggestion that this spider… Expand
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