Verbal deception from late childhood to middle adolescence and its relation to executive functioning skills.

@article{Evans2011VerbalDF,
  title={Verbal deception from late childhood to middle adolescence and its relation to executive functioning skills.},
  author={Angela D Evans and Kang Jun Lee},
  journal={Developmental psychology},
  year={2011},
  volume={47 4},
  pages={1108-16}
}
The present investigation examined 8- to 16-year-olds' tendency to lie, the sophistication of their lies, and related cognitive factors. Participants were left alone and asked not to look at the answers to a test, but the majority peeked. The researcher then asked a series of questions to examine whether the participants would lie about their cheating and, if they did lie, evaluate the sophistication of their lies. Additionally, participants completed measures of working memory, inhibitory… CONTINUE READING
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