Venom yields from Australian and some other species of snakes

@article{Mirtschin2006VenomYF,
  title={Venom yields from Australian and some other species of snakes},
  author={Peter J. Mirtschin and Nathan Dunstan and Ben Hough and Ewan J. M. Hamilton and Sharna Klein and Jonathan Lucas and David Millar and Frank Madaras and Timothy Nias},
  journal={Ecotoxicology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15},
  pages={531-538}
}
The wet and dry venom yields for most Australian native dangerous snakes and a number of non-Australian species are presented. Snakes from the Pseudonaja genus yielded higher than previously published amounts and suggest reconsideration be given to increasing the volume of antivenom in each vial. Higher percentage solids were obtained from venoms from the 4 cobra species (Naja) and Pseudechis genus included in this series. 
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References

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TLDR
Electrophoretic and Western blotting analyses of their venoms showed significantly lower avidity of Brown snake antivenom (BS-AV) for the prothrombin activator (PA) component than for other venom components, including the neurotoxins.
ANTIVENOM DEVELOPMENT IN AUSTRALIA
TLDR
Evidence of a new novel antivenom is presented, which shows high efficacy in reversing the hemostatic abnormality caused by brown snake envenomation and is also more efficient at reversing overall toxicity.
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TLDR
The Australian Small-scaled Snake, Oxyuranus microlepidotus, is the world's most venomous snake, with a murine LD50 of 0.01 mg/kg and the injected venom:LD50 ratio is 1730, the highest recorded for any snake.
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TLDR
The size of the prey does not necessarily influence the amount of venom injected by the snake, and in three snakes the mice received three to ten times more than the rats, while in two snakes there was no difference between the amounts injected into either prey.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The dose of antivenom required to prevent severe cardiovascular depression and coagulopathy induced by Pseudonaja textilis venom was 25 times the current recommended dose for clinical use and a tenfold dose was required to neutralise similar effects induced by pseudonaja affinis venom.
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