Vegetation Management and Host Density Influence Bee–Parasite Interactions in Urban Gardens

@article{Cohen2017VegetationMA,
  title={Vegetation Management and Host Density Influence Bee–Parasite Interactions in Urban Gardens},
  author={Hamutahl Cohen and Robyn D Quistberg and Stacy M. Philpott},
  journal={Environmental Entomology},
  year={2017},
  volume={46},
  pages={1313 - 1321}
}
Abstract Apocephalus borealis phorid flies, a parasitoid of bumble bees and yellow jacket wasps in North America, was recently reported as a novel parasitoid of the honey bee Apis mellifera Linnaeus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Little is known about the ecology of this interaction, including phorid fecundity on bee hosts, whether phorid-bee parasitism is density dependent, and which local habitat and landscape features may correlate with changes in parasitism rates for either bumble or honey bees. We… 

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