Veganism, bone mineral density, and body composition: a study in Buddhist nuns

@article{HoPham2009VeganismBM,
  title={Veganism, bone mineral density, and body composition: a study in Buddhist nuns},
  author={Lan T. Ho-Pham and P. L. T. Nguyen and Thi Thanh Tam Le and Thi My Trang Doan and Ngoc Thuy Thi Tran and Thi Phuong Anh Le and T. V. Nguyen},
  journal={Osteoporosis International},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={2087-2093}
}
SummaryThis cross-sectional study showed that, although vegans had lower dietary calcium and protein intakes than omnivores, veganism did not have adverse effect on bone mineral density and did not alter body composition.IntroductionWhether a lifelong vegetarian diet has any negative effect on bone health is a contentious issue. We undertook this study to examine the association between lifelong vegetarian diet and bone mineral density and body composition in a group of postmenopausal women… 
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TLDR
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Plant-based diets and bone health: sorting through the evidence.
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  • Medicine
    Current opinion in endocrinology, diabetes, and obesity
  • 2020
TLDR
There is no evidence that a plant-based diet, when carefully chosen to maintain adequate calcium and vitamin D levels, has any detrimental effects on bone health.
Effect of vegetarian diets on bone mineral density: a Bayesian meta-analysis.
TLDR
The results suggest that vegetarian diets, particularly vegan diets, are associated with lower BMD, but the magnitude of the association is clinically insignificant.
Food Groups and Bone Health
TLDR
Data suggest that diets that are higher in fruit, vegetables, milk and cereal are associated with increased bone mass as compared with diets high in processed and snack foods, and the effects of veganism and vegetarianism on bone health are not yet clear.
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