Vasopressin versus epinephrine for inhospital cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial

@article{Stiell2001VasopressinVE,
  title={Vasopressin versus epinephrine for inhospital cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial},
  author={Ian G. Stiell and Paul Hebert and George Wells and Katherine L. Vandemheen and Anthony S. L. Tang and Lyall A. J. Higginson and Jonathan F Dreyer and Catherine M. Clement and Erica Battram and Irene Watpool and Sharon Mason and Terry P Klassen and B. Weitzman},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={358},
  pages={105-109}
}
BACKGROUND Survival rates for cardiac arrest patients, both in and out of hospital, are poor. Results of a previous study suggest better outcomes for patients treated with vasopressin than for those given epinephrine, in the out-of-hospital setting. Our aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of these drugs for the treatment of in-patient cardiac arrest. METHODS We did a triple-blind randomised trial in the emergency departments, critical care units, and wards of three Canadian… Expand
A comparison of vasopressin and epinephrine for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
TLDR
The effects of vasopressin were similar to those of epinephrine in the management of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity, but vasopressingin was superior to epinphrine in patients with asystole. Expand
Vasopressin or epinephrine for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
TLDR
Evidence from randomized trials does not establish a benefit of vasopressin over epinephrine in increasing survival to discharge or improving neurologic outcomes in adult patients with nontraumatic cardiac arrest. Expand
Vasopressin and epinephrine vs. epinephrine alone in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
TLDR
The combination of vasopressin and epinephrine during advanced cardiac life support for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest does not improve outcome and is not recommended. Expand
Vasopressin improves outcome in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia: a observational cohort study
TLDR
The greater 24-hour survival rate in vasopressin-treated patients suggests that consideration of combined vasopressingin and adrenaline is warranted for the treatment of refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Expand
Vasopressin, epinephrine, and corticosteroids for in-hospital cardiac arrest.
TLDR
In this single-center trial, combined vasopressin-epinephrine and methylprednisolone during resuscitation and stress-dose hydrocortisone in postresuscitation shock improved survival in refractory in-hospital cardiac arrest. Expand
Vasopressin in Cardiac Arrest
TLDR
The current evidence for the use of vasopressin in cardiac arrest is indeterminate and given the similarly equivocal evidence of efficacy for epinephrine, either drug could be considered the first-line agent in cardiac Arrest. Expand
Vasopressin and epinephrine versus epinephrine in management of patients with cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis
TLDR
A systematic review of the efficacy of vasopressin and epinephrine use found that its combined use is better for 24h survival rate but only in one study which included 122 patients, and further investigation will be needed to support the use of this combination for cardiac arrest management. Expand
A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre trial comparing vasopressin and adrenaline in patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department.
TLDR
Combination of vasopressin and adrenaline did not improve long term survival but seemed to improve survival to admission in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest. Expand
Usefulness of vasopressin administered with epinephrine during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
TLDR
Vasopressin administered with epinephrine does not increase the rate of return of spontaneous circulation and survival duration for subjects admitted to the hospital did not differ between groups. Expand
Vasopressin for cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
BACKGROUND The current guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend vasopressin as an alternative to epinephrine for the treatment of adult shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation. TheExpand
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TLDR
This pilot study suggests that investigation of earlier use of vasopressin as a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of cardiac arrest is warranted, and in this human model of prolonged cardiac arrest, 40% of the patients receiving vasopressingin had a significant increase in CPP. Expand
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TLDR
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