Vascular Neural Network Phenotypic Transformation After Traumatic Injury: Potential Role in Long-Term Sequelae

Abstract

The classical neurovascular unit (NVU), composed primarily of endothelium, astrocytes, and neurons, could be expanded to include smooth muscle and perivascular nerves present in both the up- and downstream feeding blood vessels (arteries and veins). The extended NVU, which can be defined as the vascular neural network (VNN), may represent a new physiological unit to consider for therapeutic development in stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other brain disorders (Zhang et al., Nat Rev Neurol 8(12):711–716, 2012). This review is focused on traumatic brain injury and resultant post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow, smooth muscle cells, matrix, blood–brain barrier structures and function, and the association of these changes with cognitive outcomes as described in clinical and experimental reports. We suggest that studies characterizing TBI outcomes should increase their focus on changes to the VNN, as this may yield meaningful therapeutic targets to resolve posttraumatic dysfunction.

DOI: 10.1007/s12975-013-0304-z

Extracted Key Phrases

4 Figures and Tables

02040201520162017
Citations per Year

Citation Velocity: 13

Averaging 13 citations per year over the last 3 years.

Learn more about how we calculate this metric in our FAQ.

Cite this paper

@article{Badaut2013VascularNN, title={Vascular Neural Network Phenotypic Transformation After Traumatic Injury: Potential Role in Long-Term Sequelae}, author={Jerome Badaut and Gregory J. Bix}, journal={Translational Stroke Research}, year={2013}, volume={5}, pages={394-406} }