Varying Cost and Free Nicotinic Acid Content in Over-the-Counter Niacin Preparations for Dyslipidemia

@article{Meyers2003VaryingCA,
  title={Varying Cost and Free Nicotinic Acid Content in Over-the-Counter Niacin Preparations for Dyslipidemia},
  author={Charles Daniel Meyers and Molly C. Carr and Sang Bong Park and John D. Brunzell},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={139},
  pages={996-1002}
}
Key Summary Points: Types of Niacin Preparations No-flush (inositol hexaniacinate) Most expensive form ($21.70 per month); contains no free nicotinic acid Ineffective lipid lowering in humans; should not be used to treat dyslipidemia Sustained-release Less expensive form ($9.76 per month); contKey ains a full amount of free nicotinic acid Hepatotoxicity associated with several formulations; some brands are safe Immediate-release Least expensive form ($7.10 per month); contains a full amount of… 
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