Variety in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and the Risk of Lung Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

@article{Bchner2010VarietyIF,
  title={Variety in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and the Risk of Lung Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition},
  author={Frederike L. B{\"u}chner and Hendrik B. Bueno-de-Mesquita and Martine M. Ros and Kim Overvad and Christina Catherine Dahm and Louise Hansen and Anne Tj{\o}nneland and Francoise Clavel-Chapelon and Marie‐Christine Boutron‐Ruault and Marina Touillaud and Rudolf Kaaks and Sabine Rohrmann and Heiner Boeing and Ute N{\"o}thlings and Antonia Trichopoulou and Dimosthenis Zylis and Vardis Dilis and Domenico Palli and Sabina Sieri and Paolo Vineis and Rosario Tumino and Salvatore Panico and P H M Peeters and Carla Henrica van Gils and Eiliv Lund and Inger Torhild Gram and Tonje Braaten and Mar{\'i}a-Jos{\'e} S{\'a}nchez and Antonio Agudo and Nerea Larranaga and Eva Ardanaz and Carmen Navarro and Marcial Vicente Arg{\"u}elles and Jonas Manjer and Elisabet Wirfält and Göran Hallmans and Torgny Rasmuson and Timothy J. Key and Kay-Tee Khaw and Nicholas J. Wareham and Nadia Slimani and Anne-Claire Vergnaud and Wei W. Xun and Lambertus A. Kiemeney and Elio Riboli},
  journal={Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers \& Prevention},
  year={2010},
  volume={19},
  pages={2278 - 2286}
}
Background: We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with lower lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Methods: After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,613 of 452,187 participants with complete information were diagnosed with lung cancer. Diet diversity scores (DDS) were used to quantify the variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. Multivariable proportional hazards models were used to assess the… 

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