Varicella‐zoster virus latency in human ganglia

@article{Kennedy2002VaricellazosterVL,
  title={Varicella‐zoster virus latency in human ganglia},
  author={P. Kennedy},
  journal={Reviews in Medical Virology},
  year={2002},
  volume={12}
}
  • P. Kennedy
  • Published 2002
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Reviews in Medical Virology
Varicella‐zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus which causes varicella (chickenpox) as a primary infection, and, following a variable period during which it remains in latent form in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, reactivates in later life to cause herpes zoster (shingles). VZV is a significant cause of neurological disease including post‐herpetic neuralgia which may be persistent and highly resistant to treatment, and small and large vessel encephalitis. VZV infections are more… Expand
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  • P. Kennedy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of neurovirology
  • 2002
TLDR
Although the cell specificity of latent VZV has been controversial for almost a decade, it is now widely accepted that the virus is mainly latent in neuronal cells, with only a small proportion of non-neuronal cells infected. Expand
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TLDR
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Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of herpes zoster.
TLDR
An overview of the emerging understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of varicella and HZ is provided, in addition to exploring the current theories on latency and reactivation. Expand
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TLDR
The biological, medical, and neurological aspects of acute, latent, and reactivated infections with the neurotropic herpes viruses are reviewed. Expand
Zoster Sine Herpete
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VZV reactivation without rash can cause many, if not all, of the other neurologic disorders known to be associated with zoster, including vasculopathy, myelopathy, the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, meningoencephalitis, polyneuritis cranialis, cerebellitis, and necrotizing retinitis. Expand
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An overview of herpes zoster (shingles) is provided, with an emphasis on its potential complications, management, and prevention in the elderly population. Expand
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