Variation in compulsory psychiatric inpatient admission in England: a cross-sectional, multilevel analysis

@article{Weich2014VariationIC,
  title={Variation in compulsory psychiatric inpatient admission in England: a cross-sectional, multilevel analysis},
  author={Scott Weich and Orla McBride and Liz Twigg and Patrick Keown and Eva Cyhlarova and David Crepaz-Keay and Helen Parsons and Jan Scott and Kamaldeep S. Bhui},
  journal={Health Services and Delivery Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={2},
  pages={1-90}
}
1Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK 2School of Psychology, University of Ulster, Londonderry, UK 3Department of Geography, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK 4Academic Psychiatry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 5Mental Health Foundation, London, UK 6Centre for Psychiatry, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK 
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Variation in detention rates and its relation to service function need further explanation if the use of compulsion is to be reduced.
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