Variation in Pond Hydroperiod Affects Larval Growth in Southern Leopard Frogs, Lithobates sphenocephalus

@article{Pintar2018VariationIP,
  title={Variation in Pond Hydroperiod Affects Larval Growth in Southern Leopard Frogs, Lithobates sphenocephalus},
  author={Matthew R. Pintar and William J. Resetarits},
  journal={Copeia},
  year={2018},
  volume={106},
  pages={70 - 76}
}
Size at metamorphosis is an important correlate of amphibian fitness. Several, often interrelated factors, such as hydroperiod, competition, and food availability, determine metamorph size. Hydroperiod is a defining characteristic of ponds, but pond drying is not always a deterministic process, and refilling can occur prior to complete drying. We conducted an experiment to test if a recurring four-week partial drying/filling cycle affected amphibian growth and size using a population of… 

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