Variation in Honey Bee Gut Microbial Diversity Affected by Ontogenetic Stage, Age and Geographic Location

@article{Hroncov2015VariationIH,
  title={Variation in Honey Bee Gut Microbial Diversity Affected by Ontogenetic Stage, Age and Geographic Location},
  author={Zuzana Hroncov{\'a} and Jaroslav Havl{\'i}k and Jiř{\'i} Killer and Ivo Dosko{\vc}il and Jan Tyl and Martin Kamler and Dalibor Titěra and Josef Hakl and Jakub Mr{\'a}zek and Vera Neuzil Bunesova and Vojtěch Rada},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2015},
  volume={10}
}
Social honey bees, Apis mellifera, host a set of distinct microbiota, which is similar across the continents and various honey bee species. Some of these bacteria, such as lactobacilli, have been linked to immunity and defence against pathogens. Pathogen defence is crucial, particularly in larval stages, as many pathogens affect the brood. However, information on larval microbiota is conflicting. Seven developmental stages and drones were sampled from 3 colonies at each of the 4 geographic… 
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