Variability of space-use patterns in a free living eusocial rodent, Ansell’s mole-rat indicates age-based rather than caste polyethism

@article{klba2016VariabilityOS,
  title={Variability of space-use patterns in a free living eusocial rodent, Ansell’s mole-rat indicates age-based rather than caste polyethism},
  author={Jan {\vS}kl{\'i}ba and Matěj L{\"o}vy and Hynek Burda and Radim {\vS}umbera},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2016},
  volume={6}
}
Eusocial species of African mole-rats live in groups cooperating on multiple tasks and employing division of labour. In captivity, individuals of the same group differ in cooperative contribution as well as in preference for a particular task. Both can be viewed as polyethism. However, little information is available from free-ranging mole-rats, which live in large burrow systems. We made an attempt to detect polyethism in the free-living Ansell’s mole-rat (Fukomys anselli) as differences in… Expand
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