Variability in the Middle Stone Age of Eastern Africa

@article{Tryon2013VariabilityIT,
  title={Variability in the Middle Stone Age of Eastern Africa},
  author={Christian A. Tryon and J. Tyler Faith},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2013},
  volume={54},
  pages={S234 - S254}
}
Eastern Africa is an important area to study early populations of Homo sapiens because subsets of those populations likely dispersed to Eurasia and subsequently throughout the globe during the Upper Pleistocene. The Middle Stone Age (MSA) archaeology of this region, particularly aspects of stone-tool technology and typology, is highly variable with only rare cases of geographic and temporal patterning. Although there are differences in timing and perhaps frequency of occurrence, those elements… Expand
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