Variability in echolocation call design of 26 Swiss bat species: consequences, limits and options for automated field identification with a synergetic pattern recognition approach

@inproceedings{Obrist2004VariabilityIE,
  title={Variability in echolocation call design of 26 Swiss bat species: consequences, limits and options for automated field identification with a synergetic pattern recognition approach},
  author={Martin K. Obrist and Ruedi Boesch and Peter F. Fl{\"u}ckiger},
  year={2004}
}
Pattern recognition algorithms offer a promising approach to recognizing bat species by their echolocation calls. Automated systems like synergetic classifiers may contribute significantly to operator-independent species identification in the field. However, it necessitates the assembling of an appropriate database of reference calls, a task far from trivial. We present data on species specific flexibility in call parameters of all Swiss bat species (except Nyctalus lasiopterus and Plecotus… 

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