Vanishing MS T2-bright lesions before puberty

@article{Chabas2008VanishingMT,
  title={Vanishing MS T2-bright lesions before puberty},
  author={Dorothée Chabas and Tamara Castillo-Trivi{\~n}o and Ellen M. Mowry and Jonathan B. Strober and Orit A. Glenn and Emmanuelle Waubant},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={71},
  pages={1090 - 1093}
}
Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) onset before puberty may have a distinct clinical presentation. Pediatric patients with MS may less often meet MRI diagnostic criteria for adults. Whether initial MRI presentation is distinct in prepubertal patients is unknown. Methods: We queried the UCSF MS database for pediatric patients with MS (onset ≤18 years) who underwent brain MRI within 3 months of initial symptoms. The overall number of lesions and the number of well-defined and ovoid, large… 

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